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What is the Cost of Soundproofing vs. Moving House?

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There’s no doubt about it: soundproofing is cheaper and less hassle than moving house!

 

Unfortunately, many people believe moving to a new house to escape the noise is a better option than simply soundproofing their home. It’s common to want to move home to escape the noise from next door. But if you love the area, love the street, and you’re only unhappy with the noise from next door, then consider soundproofing your home instead.

Unless you move to a detached house, there’s a very good chance you’ll wind up with the same noise problems as before, if not worse.  With flexible employment shift patterns, noisy devices and flimsy new build properties, modern life is getting noisier. It’s likely that noise will be a part of your new home, too.

Many people don’t realise that when you soundproof a room you’re actually getting a brand new room, newly decorated, and it doesn’t take much effort to position everything perfectly for when you move back in. If you’ve ever wanted a TV on the wall, a new layout, new lighting and sockets, different skirting, or new doors, then soundproofing is the perfect opportunity to design your dream living room or bedroom.

How much does it cost to move to a detached property?

 

Let’s start with moving to a nice detached house in the same area:

£1,850 for conveyancing fees, which are a collection of legal costs you pay when you buy or sell a house.

£750 in survey fees

£1,600 for the removals

£5,550 for estate agents fees

£8,500 for stamp duty land tax

Total cost to move to a detached house: £18,250*

*Source: https://www.moneysupermarket.com/mortgages/cost-of-moving-calculator/

Why not use the calculator above to find your cost of moving.

cost of moving

The example above is based on a three bedroom detached house price of £370,000.

This figure is based on selling your current house and moving into the

  • Same value detached property in the same area,
  • With no additional mortgage costs or arrangement fees, or additional deposit,
  • No additional money spent getting your house ready for market,
  • Assuming your new house is fit for living,
  • That it requires no additional work,
  • That it has no problems that need addressing urgently, and
  • Assuming your commuting travel cost are all the same.
How does this compare to soundproofing that noise problem you have?

 

Soundproofing a room from noisy neighbours can start from £2,500 and go as high as £12,000 per room, depending on what types of noise you want reduced.

Road traffic noise soundproofing starts at £1,500 per room, to over £18,000 for the whole house.

These rough figures suggest that soundproofing is considerably cheaper than moving. Even if you decided to soundproof every room in your house to a high standard, treating all the different noise paths, soundproofing is still more convenient and less disruptive than moving. Better still, it can normally be installed in just a matter of weeks.

It’s common knowledge that moving house is one of the most stressful life events, but soundproofing, although still somewhat disruptive, happens over a much shorter period of time. If you move to a new area, you have to find your way around, meet the new neighbours, and become familiar with different shops. Some people may need to think about changing schools, vets, and health clinics. But when you soundproof, the company takes care of the whole project for you, with no extra disruption.

family lounge

The unwanted noise in your house comes down to the construction of the building. The majority of new build homes constructed in the 1990s onwards are sadly worse for noise than older houses. If you move to escape the noise, it will have to be to a detached property because moving to another semi-detached house will not solve the problem. It’s the construction of the building itself that’s the issue, and not necessarily the neighbours.

The grass is not always greener

Joe lived in an end of terrace property, but the noise was affecting him and his family. Though he considered soundproofing, in the end he decided to move to a semi-detached house. Joe’s new house was a lovely three bed, semi-detached house with an open plan kitchen extension and large double bedrooms, plus it was closer to schools than his old house and had a driveway and garage, too. The attached next door house was rented and when Joe and his family moved in, things were absolute bliss. They were so happy with their decision to move – for the first 6 months, that is. When new tenants moved in, things took a turn for the worse. Suddenly Joe and his family became fully aware of the new tenants next door and their activities.

Music went on until the early hours of the morning during the week, together with foul language and bedroom noises that Joe’s twin boys did not need to hear. Despite calling the police and speaking with the tenants and landlord, the situation didn’t improve, and Joe and his family began to question the move. It was a difficult situation, and the stress, frustration and sense of helplessness caused Joe and his wife to lose sleep.

They heard about soundproofing and the mixed reviews it gets, with some people saying it had changed their lives and others saying it had done nothing at all. Joe was concerned what the results would be, and whether soundproofing actually could reduce the noise those tenants were making.

After a soundproofing consultation visit from Quietco, Joe was shown that someone had in fact already attempted to soundproof the living room, the boys’ bedroom above the living room, and the kitchen. This attempt had been made before he moved in. Joe realised that the way this soundproofing had been installed meant it amplified the noise by almost 10dB, effectively doubling the noise from the tenants.

Joe found that Quietco’s 4 step method of addressing the main cause, finding a solution to the direct noise paths, soundproofing the indirect noise paths and soundproofing the fixtures and fittings was more logical than moving again. After consulting with many people that had similar installations in similar age houses, Joe decided to invest in soundproofing the living room, boys’ bedroom and main bedroom.

With access to the property next door we were able to conduct a UKAS accredited sound test and Joe was also able to test the new soundproofing himself with specialist DJ equipment. He was absolutely delighted with the result. Not only does he not hear any more noise from the tenants, but he is also able to confidently practice his music mixing without bothering the tenants.

No place like home

 

If you’re struggling with noise and considering a move to escape it, consider making your existing house a home first. It will be far less trouble than moving, and cheaper, too.

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Have you ever moved to escape the noise from neighbours?

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